Daisy Jopling mixes violin playing with classical and rock inclinations in ‘Awakening’ [review]

Daisy Jopling has a particular blend of violin playing– mixing classical and rock inclination.

On Feb. 3, Daisy Jopling released her eighth album, Awakening. Born in London, Jopling is now New York-based. She has a particular blend of violin playing that mixes classical and rock inclinations. Awakening expands this cocktail into 10 tracks with full instrumentation.

Awakening opens with “Primordial.” This sweeping track has a cinematographic sense about it. Much like an overture, it touches on a variety of moods – while building a sense of intrigue. This violin-forward piece feels expansive and driving. It is a solid start from Daisy Jopling.

The second track on this album is called “Plastic Day.” Opening with a sorrowful violin solo, it is clear that listeners have moved past introduction and into the midst of a story. As additional instrumentation layers in, a sense of hope arises in tone. However, the entire piece evokes dim moonlight and a slow dance.

As the record continues, it becomes clear that much of Daisy Jopling’s work falls under ‘classical with an edge.’ Though, she diverges from this on occasion. Jopling touches on Celtic folk sounds as well as salsa rhythms at times, while “Take Time” and “Childhood Dreams” sound like cuts from a musical.

These sidetracks manifest with varying levels of success throughout the album. Her folk-inspired pieces are strong, but tracks like “World Citizen” feel contrived. The underlying rhythms in this particular track sound canned, while the beatboxing does not feel connected to the instrumentation.

Daisy Jopling has clear talent as an artist and performer. The pieces that fall within her spicy classical groove are well executed and engaging. It is also interesting to see various pathways she explores from that primary roadway. Though, some of these lead to success, while other leave audiences confused. Overall, Awakening is an interesting listen with some very strong tracks.

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