10 things Kurt Vonnegut said better than anyone you know

April 11, 2017 marked 10 years since the famous American writer, Kurt Vonnegut, died. The social critic was notorious for numerous novels like Slaughterhouse-FiveCat’s Cradle and Deadeye Dick.

Shortly after his death, The New York Times acknowledged the complexity and originality within his literature. Like his novels, his short stories attacked the ways institutionalized practices are forced on humans.

Sometimes he paints bright and hopeful images. But there are other instances where his literature is depressing and dark. Even though his writing differs, he manages to incorporate social criticism and dark, witty humor. Because of his insightful commentary, he appealed to many people.

But after 84 years of an adventurous life, his journey came to an end. Along the way, he left us with a lot of novels, essays and plays to read and issues to think about. According to The Washington Post, he was the author of at least 19 novels beginning his career in 1952.

In fact, his hometown of Indianapolis, Indiana, commemorated the satirist by naming 2007 “The Year of Vonnegut.” It was a time for people to mourn the loss of the beloved author, as well as celebrate his traumatic life. Although Vonnegut was extremely successful, he had a difficult time battling mental illness and the abuse of drugs and alcohol.

Overall, this is a glimpse into Vonnegut’s lessons about fate, life, adversity and individual identity. You’ll find that he verbalizes what society thinks better than anyone you will meet on the street.

Page 1 of 1112345
No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply


Fitale Wari

Fitale Wari is a junior at Denison University where she is a double major in Communication and English Literature with a concentration in Narrative Nonfiction Writing. In 2016 she received the Nan Nowik Memorial Award for campus organizing. She's a 2017 graduate of the Leadershape Institute and was inducted into Lambda Pi Eta in 2017. She is from Buffalo, New York.