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‘The Colbert Report’ recap - 2/27/13

By Ricky Riley,

This episode focuses on Guantanamo Bay, Secretary Kerry, Secretary Hagel, and features Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art.

The Colbert Report is a profit making machine. The show makes Viacom a boat load of dough and the company should thank Colbert for scrotum soaks. Then Colbert presents his intern, Jay, to the audience. He is a young man that loves Halls cough drops. Let the cool in.

The first topic of the show focuses on Gitmo tribunals. The trails feature the terrorist masterminds of 9/11. Colbert then welcomes Neal Katyal from Georgetown Law School to talk about Guantanamo Bay. It has been reported that the CIA have been tapping the proceedings and have prevented journalists from hearing the sessions as they happened. The judge of the Gitmo proceedings was not aware of the CIA kill switch.

Kerry has made the case for American greatness. We have a right to be stupid because it says it in the constitution next to the penis doodle. Colbert points out that Kerry lives up to this mantra. In a news conference, a week ago, Kerry mispronounces the country Kazakhstan by calling it Kyrgyzstan a country that neighbors Kazakhstan. Even though the cultures are very similar the liberal media attacked him.

In the final minutes of the show, Paola Antonelli shares some of the new creations of up and coming designers. She talks about the museum's new video game exhibit. The future is now. Be yourself and you will be modern.

The idea is to make everything disappear. Some designs include vase made by bees (which may be cheaper than letting Chinese people do it), a wind powered dandelion ball that detonates land mines, and an earthquake proof table that will protect children.

This episode has a little for everyone. The guest is a nice change of pace from the long string of novelists of late. This episode gets two thumbs up.

The Colbert Report airs on Comedy Central.

 

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