Exercise may help women tolerate breast cancer medicine side effects

By Funke Oyelade,

A new study reveals exercise can help women taking breast cancer medicine to tolerate the drugs, and suffering from joint pains, muscle aches, hot flashes, and nausea.

NBC News reported 1.7 million women around the world are diagnosed with breast cancer globally.

According to the Associated Press, researchers found exercise helped ease the aches and joint pains caused by the medicine Femara Aromasin. Femara Aromasin is given to women for five years after treatment to block estrogen to prevent hormone type tumors. Some women, due to the pain, decide to stop using the medicine which can hurt their progress.

Researchers used 121 postmenopausal women taking forms of aromatase inhibitors and complained of joint pain for a pain survey. Half of the women were given two supervised strength training sessions in addition to 150 minutes of aerobatic exercise per week. The rest were given advice on the importance of exercising and did their usual exercise rituals.

After a year, there was a significant drop in the joint pain of those given supervised strength training than the ones that were not. This is the first study with exercise geared toward aromatase users.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

 
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