Dwayne Johnson opens up about his depression

By Amanda Stewart,

We all see Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as a strong, tall actor. However, he recently opened up during an interview with The Hollywood Reporter about a time that he was “crying constantly.”

Johnson first fell into hard times when he was 14, according to Us Weekly, when he was evicted from the home he and his mother shared.

He moved on from those hard times though. He bulked up and became a local football star and attended the University of Miami on a full athletic scholarship. During his first year in college, Johnson experienced multiple injuries which lead to deep depression.

“I didn’t want to do anything,” Johnson said in the interview. His depression deepened when he was not picked for the NFL draft. He went on to play for a Canadian Football League, but just after he joined a team, Johnson was released.

This lead to the first separation from Dany Garcia, his girlfriend and eventually his wife. "There is no more football. My relationship was crushed. That was my absolute worst time,” he said.

Johnson, according to The Huffington Post, fell into an even deeper depression after his divorce from his college sweetheart.

"Once I manned up and became accountable for the mess I was in, that's when it all hit me," he said. "What kind of dad does this make me? What kind of man will I now become? Failing at marriage and as a husband was a heavy thing, and divorce had that special way of knocking me on my ass."

He did not fall into the “I hate my ex” cliche either. Actually, Garcia, his ex and mother of his 12 year old daughter, still handles his business. Johnson’s brother is his producing partner and Garcia’s current husband is his conditioning coach.

Though he has seen a lot of depression and hard times in his past, the star has not let it hinder his work. The films produced in 2013 with Johnson starring grossed $1.3 billion.

The star will appear Hercules this year.

image courtesy of INFphoto.com

Fun Stuff

 
 

Join Our Newsletter

Popular Threads