Andrew Reed shows artistic talent with '70s flair in 'If All The World Were Right'

'If All The World Were Right' Album Cover, Andrew Reed

Rock/Americana artist Andrew Reed is a creative who aspires to seek the best out of everything.  His latest effort is an excellent example of him trying to extract positivity out of every experience.  Released on Jan. 1, 2018, If All The World Were Right embraces new beginnings and Reed’s outlook to shun celebrity culture and no-do-good commercialism.  His music exemplifies his philosophies, circumventing what he dismisses as “non-value-adding,” while heavily emphasizing the creative spirit and humility involved in artistic expressions.  His genre of music, which is fittingly described as “Introspective Rock/Acoustic,” is shaped by his authentic songwriting craft and strong viewpoint of the world.

The album opens up with “Sailed Away” that begins with the sound of strumming of the acoustic guitars.  Eventually, the melodic cadences of the piano joins in, in the aftermath.  A great folksy, Americana sound can be heard from the coalescing of dynamic cadences.  Dreamy and melodic, the track is also catchy and upbeat.  Reed’s vocals make it a little hard to distinguish the lyrics on this song, but the melodious sound waves on the piano and strings really make up for it.  The music is up-keyed and energized and really nails it with the tight musicianship.

“Cure My Mind” starts out with some enumerating over the acoustic guitar with a great folksy appeal.  Some melodic guitars resound on the track.  The song is about an appeal for someone to put his mind at ease – one whose mind is troubled and needs a reprieve from all his worries.  The percussions give the song a more enthused appeal.

“Life In The City” has a great classic rock vibe with some upbeat drumming rhythms.  Reed picks it up another notch with his vocals, really adding an extra punch to the rock track.  About life in the city, where nothing is as it seems, an edgy saxophone sounds off mid-way into the song.

“Putting Things In Order” is a retro-sounding track, enlivened by a high-end '70s vibe.  A sonorous electric guitar resonates on the song, as an added layer of piano keys trickle in.  Altogether the instrumentations elicit a soothing sound with a placating appeal.  The melodious track is about coming home to a place disrupted in chaos, but it is all about putting yourself in that state of mind where you can turn the disorder into order.  Overall, a pleasing sound, an epic guitar solo erupts mid-song.

The title-track, “If All The World Were Right,” fully elicits a folk-rock sound and Americana vibe.  The philosophical take on this folk song asks if all the world were right, what disillusionments would never exist.  Seething with socially aware lyrics, harmonious vocals dynamically resound on this track.

“Carolina In The Morning” starts off with some distinct strumming from the acoustic guitar with Reed’s vocals later joining in.  About waking in the mornings next to the girl of his dreams, the sunny sound off this track makes for a catchy vibe and upbeat appeal.

“Where She Goes” unfolds with a quiet and reticent riff that gives off a soothing appeal.  With a great folk cadence, this slower sauntering ballad is about a girl that he once knew who once had an epic smile that eventually went away.  This young girl eventually grew into a young woman who would fashion a broken smile wherever she went.

“The Ghost Of Robert Johnson” opens up with a more somber cadence than the previous songs, as a darker sound falls across the track.  The song touches upon a more blues-laced sound with interlaced guitars woven into the song.  The great revving music coming from the acoustic and electric guitars and Reed’s immediate hushed vocals really guns for your attention.

About the excitement of catching the open road with the sun slinging down and with all the yawning open yonder up ahead, “Open Road” begins with the strumming of the acoustic guitar and steady beat of the drums.

On “All Of My Life” a cascade of guitars sounds off toward the beginning of the track.  Reed’s whispery vocals give off a hushed sensibility that aptly unfolds along with the sweet and soft melody of the piano and guitar.

“Hourglass” starts off with some dynamic strumming from the guitar.  A steady drumming beat keeps up with the down-tempo of the song.  A really happening ballad that is about the passage of time and the journeys he and his friend has gone through together, as their weary body ages but their minds are still fresh from the experience.  Traces of lush strings underline the track along with melodious background vocal harmonies.

The album ends with the closers, “Sailed Away (Reprise)” that starts off with a wall of guitars and ends with the sounding off of trumpets, and on the dynamic spoken word piece “All The World Is Right (Poem)” that reaches out to audiences with the lone sound of the trumpet with a melancholy piano sidling in along with Reed’s reading voice.

Andrew Reed has spent his energies not conforming, dispelling the idea of commercialism from his work.  His authentic songcraft strongly stems from an organic sound with socially aware content, overall giving off an eye-opening experience.

Reed is a talented artist whose music reflects his pro-active outlook.   His passions are evident in his intimate acoustic sessions, making his introspective music an extremely uplifting listening experience.

Reed is a natural with a great flow to his unique sound.  Brimming with artistic talent with a flair for a retro '70s-inspired cadence in his folk-rock/acoustic in his latest, If All The World Were All Right aptly expresses the artist’s thoughts and inspirations with eloquence and grace.

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